Document Type: Letter to Editor

Author

South Asian Clinical Toxicology Research Collaboration, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Central Clinical School, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia

Abstract

Achieving a practical and productive balance in collaborative research between partners from high and lower income countries (North-South Collaborations) requires seeking win-win solutions. This issue requires time to engage each other and to understand each participant’s research priorities and to identify areas of mutual interest. In SACTRC’s experience, key elements include; building research capacity that is closely linked to the research being conducted by the partners, establishing a clear research identity for the group that facilitates further funding and publishing in accessible (open access) high impact journals (1).
The preparation of any research paper requires a significant effort and time. Publishing in high impact journals allows both young researchers to be more competitive in career advancement and established researchers to be able to get further funding to support collaborative research. The challenge for any new journal such as the APJMT is to build a reputation that will impress both readers and funders (2). While the flaws of publication metrics such as h-index and journal impact factors are recognised, they remain important factors when seeking competitive grants. Although the importance of translational research is increasingly recognised by granting bodies in funding decisions, the metrics for measuring this are not well defined (3).

Keywords

Achieving a practical and productive balance in collaborative research between partners from high and lower income countries (North-South Collaborations) requires seeking win-win solutions. This issue requires time to engage each other and to understand each participant’s research priorities and to identify areas of mutual interest. In SACTRC’s experience, key elements include; building research capacity that is closely linked to the research being conducted by the partners, establishing a clear research identity for the group that facilitates further funding and publishing in accessible (open access) high impact journals (1).

The preparation of any research paper requires a significant effort and time. Publishing in high impact journals allows both young researchers to be more competitive in career advancement and established researchers to be able to get further funding to support collaborative research. The challenge for any new journal such as the APJMT is to build a reputation that will impress both readers and funders (2). While the flaws of publication metrics such as h-index and journal impact factors are recognised, they remain important factors when seeking competitive grants. Although the importance of translational research is increasingly recognised by granting bodies in funding decisions, the metrics for measuring this are not well defined (3).

  1. Dawson AH, Buckley NA. Toxicologists in public health--Following the path of Louis Roche (based on the Louis Roche lecture "An accidental toxicologist in public health", Bordeaux, 2010). Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2011 Feb;49(2):94-101.
  2. Afshari R. What is the “Best Research” for Low Income Countries? Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2013 Mar;2(1):1.
  3. Lean ME, Mann JI, Hoek JA, Elliot RM, Schofield G. Translational research. BMJ 2008 Aug 28;337:a863.